Natural Scenery

10 stunning autumn walks in the Peak District

The Peak District stretches across Derbyshire, filled with hills, valleys, rivers and reservoirs with some historical villages sprinkled across the country’s oldest national park.

As we head into autumn, now is the perfect time to witness one of nature’s finest feats as the green leaves of the trees become sepia-toned, the early morning dew is becoming settled on the grass and a thin veil of fog covers the surrounding fields.

Nothing beats an autumn walk, where the air is crisp and you meander aimlessly along a crunchy auburn footpath.

And with the Peak District only a stone’s throw a way, it is the perfect day trip spot for an autumn walk.

Here are our suggestions for some of the best walks to experience autumnal scenery:

Derwent Reservoir



A sea of colour at Derwent Reservoir
A sea of colour at Derwent Reservoir

Enshrouded by a forest, in autumn, Derwent Reservoir becomes a kaleidoscope of orange, reds and yellows, making for some immense photo opportunities.

Firmly embedded in British Second World War history, the Derwent Reservoir was used by the pilots of 617 Squadron to practice Operation Chastise – better known as the “Dambuster raids”.

With plenty of walking trails to choose from, you’ll be spoilt for choice. Make sure to save time to visit the mighty Derwent dam on your visit though!

Curbar Edge



Curbar Edge on an autumn morning
Curbar Edge on an autumn morning

Looming over the village of Calver is Curbar Edge, a rocky stretch of boulders which presents one of the best views in the Peak District.

The route has a perfect balance of lush shrubbery and large slabs of rock to picnic on and appreciate the view.

In autumn, walking routes are surrounded by corridors of chestnut-coloured ferns and heather.

But make sure to bring a coat as it gets quite windy up on the top.

Padley Gorge



Walk along gently flowing streams at Padley Gorge
Walk along gently flowing streams at Padley Gorge

Take in the beautiful palette of autumn colours as you wander along one of the many weaving paths Padley Gorge offers.

Have a stroll along Burbage Brook as it flows underneath charismatic footbridges, and take in the tumbling waterfalls Padley Gorge has on offer.

If you are hungry you could even end your walk at the Grindleford café for a bite to eat.

Chatsworth House



Autumn at Chatsworth House
Autumn at Chatsworth House

With its grand design only enhanced by the apricot and crimson colours of autumn, Chatsworth House offers plenty for a fall day out.

From dazzling water features, to a diverse selection of plants and trees, the 105-acres offer lots for all the family to explore.

The “Palace of the Peaks” also provides a solution if the weather turns soggy, as there are 30 rooms to discover in the house and a huge collection of art.

River Derwent



There are different ways to experience the beauty of the River Derwent
There are different ways to experience the beauty of the River Derwent

If Chatsworth House isn’t your cup of tea, the River Derwent runs right alongside it.

66 miles of pristine, azure water running through the hills of the Peak District.

Stretching between Matlock and Derby, the river is perfect for a gentle jolly in the country. But if you want a more hands-on day out perhaps a canoe trip down a section of the river will suffice.

Either way the trees guarding the river banks turn into a riot of colour, creating an alluring sight for the eyes.

Castleton



Winnats Pass on a crisp autumn morning
Winnats Pass on a crisp autumn morning

A delightful countryside village located in the heart of the Peak District, Castleton has lots of ways to spend an autumn day.

You can climb the steep, unforgiving hills of Mam Tor, or perhaps experience the show caves Castleton has on offer.

A recommended spot for a smashing view is Winnats path. Beware though as the name Winnats comes from “Windy Gates” as one of the windier entrances into Castleton, so an umbrella isn’t recommended.

Bamford Edge



The beauty of Lady Bower can only be properly appreciated from Bamford Edge
The beauty of Lady Bower can only be properly appreciated from Bamford Edge

Overlooking the majestic Ladybower reservoir, only a short accessible walk stands between you and the crescendo of Bamford Edge.

A two mile round walk is required to reach the viewpoint where you can see some of the most astonishing views the Peak District has to offer.

After being blinded by the beauty of the autumnal views, you can head into the village of Bamford and cap the day off with a cold pint from one of the village’s many pubs.

Eyam



Boundary stones from during the plague lockdown
Boundary stones from during the plague lockdown

The Peak District is rich with history, and one of the most historic villages is Eyam. In the 1660s Eyam went into a 14-month lockdown because of the bubonic plague after a flea-infested cloth was brought up from London.

Boundary stones still surround Eyam, a place where residents from other villages would leave food for the quarantined.

With plenty of walking routes through and around the village, it is a popular spot for walkers and there is even a few cafes and pubs to end your day.

Stanage Edge



Stanage Edge is a popular climbing spot
Stanage Edge is a popular climbing spot

Just north of Hathersage is Stanage Edge. A popular place for rock climbers and walkers, breath-taking views of the Hope Valley can be seen here.

Have an explore of the intriguing rock formations, or try your hand at climbing some of the smaller, safer rock faces.

As it is just outside of Sheffield, Stanage Edge is easy to reach by bus from the city centre.

Lumsdale Falls



Lumsdale Falls in autumn is a photographers dream
Lumsdale Falls in autumn is a photographers dream

Just outside of Matlock, is a stunning collection of tranquil waterfalls in a serene setting for an autumn walk.

At this time of year, the canopy of reds and oranges turns the pale, cold sun into a golden spotlight bouncing off of the racing streams, which combined with the carpet of fallen leaves makes for an amazing photo.

If you look close enough you’ll even find evidence of ruined mills scattered along the ground.

Do you have a favourite walk? Please email us at newsdesk@derbytelegraph.co.uk

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