Cancer

Abdominal fat increases the risk of death from prostate cancer | by Babul Hosen | Oct, 2021

Babul Hosen
Abdominal fat increases the risk of death from prostate cancer

The risk of dying from prostate cancer is closely linked to the accumulation of fat around the abdomen and waist. Researchers at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom have found the subject in a study. However, they did not find any relationship between the total body fat and the risk of prostate cancer.

The study was conducted on more than two million men in the UK. It will be presented at the European and International Conference on Obesity (ECOICO) this week.

Fox News reports that the study was conducted over a period of 10 years among people aged 40–69. Those who took part in the study did not have cancer at first.

The researchers used data from the Health Administration database and recorded body mass index (BMI), percentage of body fat, waist-to-hip ratio, and waist circumference to conduct their research. In addition, the study team’s lifestyle and socioeconomic factors, as well as the history of treatment and risk of death from prostate cancer were considered in determining each participant’s adiposity or obesity.

A subsequent follow-up showed that 571 of the study participants had died of prostate cancer, the release said.

Researchers have found that there is no clear link between BMI or the percentage of total body fat and the risk of prostate cancer. However, there is a clear link between central adopathy (fat around the abdomen and waist) and the risk of death.

The researchers also found that those with a waist-to-hip ratio of less than 25 percent had a 34 percent higher risk of dying from prostate cancer than those with a ratio of more than 25 percent.

The director of the study. “We found a significant link between fat around the abdomen and waist and the risk of dying from prostate cancer,” says Aurora Perez-Carnage. However, we found no clear relationship between total body fat and the risk of dying from prostate cancer.

However, the researchers, who conducted the study with colleagues from the Cancer Epidemiology Unit at the Nuffield Department of Population Health in the UK, believe that large-scale research is needed among many more people in other populations to confirm their findings.

Dr. Perez-Carnage added that high BMI increases the risk of various diseases, including other types of cancer. So when excess fat accumulates in the human body — wherever it is — then the issue should be given importance.

Future research will give a clearer picture of this invasive prostate cancer and adolescence, the researchers say.


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