Cancer

Cancer’s Kryptonite: 7 Scientifically Approved Life Hacks | by Michael Hunter, MD | BeingWell | Dec, 2023

IN THE VAST EXPANSE OF HEALTH AND WELL-BEING, one shadow looms large — cancer. However, what if we told you that science had uncovered life hacks akin to kryptonite capable of thwarting cancer’s advances? An iullustration shows a target on a cancer cells. The cell has spindly, octopus-like arms.
Targeting a cancer cell. Adobe Stock P.hotos

IN THE VAST EXPANSE OF HEALTH AND WELL-BEING, one shadow looms large — cancer. However, what if we told you that science had uncovered life hacks akin to kryptonite capable of thwarting cancer’s advances?

I am a cancer doctor and am committed to not only helping those with the disease but also reducing the risk for others.

After over 30 years as a radiation oncologist, I am shaken every time I meet someone with cancer.

This essay aims to unravel seven lifestyle recommendations rooted in scientific research, offering practical insights accessible to everyone.

A person puts their index finger and thumb together to frame the distant sub. High 25(OH)D concentrations were not associated with a lower cancer risk, except for colorectal cancer. Results from intervention studies did not show an effect of vitamin D supplementation on disease occurrence, including colorectal cancer.
Photo by Daoudi Aissa on Unsplash

As I delve into each life hack supported by credible references, I will try to demystify cancer risk reduction and empower you to take proactive steps in dropping your chances of suffering from the disease.

Our journey into cancer prevention begins with the vibrant world of fruits and vegetables. Scientific studies consistently highlight the protective power of a colorful diet rich in antioxidants.

These compounds, abundant in fruits and vegetables, act as warriors against cancer-causing free radicals.

A white shallow bowl is topped by bow-tie pasta, sliced tomoatos , and lettuce. M.D. Anderson Cancer Center experts offer this view: No food (or food group) is guaranteed to prevent cancer. Excluding specific foods will not eliminate your risk. However, consuming a plant-based diet (including beans, fruit, vegetables, and whole grains) and following some basic guidelines can help reduce your cancer risk (and other chronic diseases).
Photo by Eaters Collective on Unsplash

M.D. Anderson Cancer Center experts offer this view:

No food (or food group) is guaranteed to prevent cancer. Excluding specific foods will not eliminate your risk. However, consuming a plant-based diet (including beans, fruit, vegetables, and whole grains) and following some basic guidelines can help reduce your cancer risk (and…


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